Fisher & Paykel proudly proclaim their dedication to being a design-led organisation with a keen focus on engaging their customers.

We often think of design as the overall aesthetics of a product. We think its the fashioning of a product, the first impression and the outer edge but design thinking leads us to design products that are far more valuable to us than that. It goes to the heart of how we want to incorporate products and use them in our life.

F&P COO, Jeremy Sargeant states “life is lived around appliances, demonstrating how our human-centred design enriches our customers’ lives”.

A key element of the Fisher & Paykel brand is The Social Kitchen – the concept that underpins the brand’s entire design philosophy.

“We understand that the kitchen is the heart of home. It is a social space, where we prepare and cook food for our families, help kids with their homework and entertain friends, and in our fast paced world, taking time to celebrate those special moments we spend with our family and friends in this space is more important than ever. This philosophy is embedded deep within our culture and is why we have been able to consistently challenge conventional appliance design and deliver products that are truly tailored to human needs,” he said.

What is innovation?

We often think of innovation being based around a sole individual who has a spark of genius or a genius cohort in a lab working for hours to develop something spectacular that the world has never seen before when in fact this is totally off base. It’s organisations that go out and connect with people, connect with consumers. They analyse the data but they don’t stop there. They reach out, observe and talk to users and consumers.

Now you might be thinking we don’t have the big budget for that but you couldn’t be more wrong. The smaller the budget the more need for the upfront investment on spending time to identify the user/consumer/client need. The more time you invest upfront the more money you’ll save in development, launch and marketing phase.

The importance of understanding your customer

F&P have transferred their wealth of customer insights and their focus on human centred design into the development of their new website. Which I would expect from an organisation dedicated to analysing human needs and their customers journey.

Customers often search online before they even step into a store. We all want to go in well armed so the way you present your products online will help your potential customers weigh you up in a lickety split.

It’s a perfect example of where an organisation needs to direct the narrative of their first impression and are confident of their understanding of their customers. Website design is commonly outsourced but organisations need to realise that they hold the key to true customer insights and where it fits in within their customers journey. Take the reigns I say.

Where does website design fit in?

“The website is one of the most important windows into what we stand for, it brings our insights to the fore and delves deep into how life is lived around appliances, demonstrating how our human-centred design enriches our customers’ lives.”

Jeremy goes on to state “We have brought our brand values to life on the first landing page, elevating them into a prime position in the customer journey. While our website is mobile-optimised, for the best possible user experience, the desktop allows visitors enjoy the immersive first look into our beautiful products,” stated F&P COO, Jeremy Sargeant

How can we learn from F&P?

Let’s make this quick.

Analyse your customers journey. How do they find you? When they do find you map out the next steps. At what point to they decide to buy and why? Is it the first 30 seconds or does it take 30 days. Identifying the point of decision making is vital. Here’s a tip: the buying decision is often made from an emotional base not a rational one. How do you influence the positive emotion of your potential or returning customer.

Talk to past customers. Talk to the satisfied customers but more importantly talk to the unsatisfied ones. Then create a map and analyse what changes and improvements you can make along the way. Is there a point where customers get overwhelmed, confused or unsure? How can you help them through it?

These are the keys to a human centred customer experience. Spend the time analysing the steps your customers go through in their decision making process and it’s guaranteed to pay off .

Fisher & Paykel enhances website experience

Here’s the link to the full video:

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/play/u8IpI-2r-Do3SYGdswSDVKAsW47sLa-shiMZ8_NczErnAiZVYVeiMLARN-ShUcwp7P9a14LzXvF-_L0-?startTime=1590544384000&_x_zm_rtaid=EQ1v4xDERuufQLVbnQ9ehA.1593326762071.cd128a166afc351726536869b713fb89&_x_zm_rhtaid=487

We need creativity now more than ever. Creativity helps us deal with the big A word.

Ambiguity.

In a rapidly changing environment knowing the right answer off the bat is near impossible. The whole idea of ambiguity is that often we are not even clear on the problem. We are good at assuming what we think is the problem but until we stop and dedicate time to unlocking our curiosity and unleashing our creative thought, we can’t be sure.

Creativity implies freedom – freedom to think in new ways. However, we are human and as we know NEW ways of doing things can be interpreted as a threat to many of us. The whole theory of change management has been in demand for years simply due to our inability to adapt to change.


“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future”

– John F Kennedy

Here’s the four things you need to get right to help creativity thrive in your organisation:

1. Bring your whole self to work

This isn’t walking into the office (or your home office) in your track pants and stained shirt, but it is the ability to be open and transparent with the people you’re working with. It is forming a foundation of psychological safety. No one will risk potential ridicule or negative reactions from sharing new ideas, especially radical ones. There needs to be encouragement, acceptance and acknowledgement from leaders.

There’s also needs to be an acceptance that the lines of your personal life and your work life are blurred now more than ever before.

With the viral BBC clip in 2017 now certainly seeming like every parents reality we’ve had the opportunity to get a glimpse into our colleagues life like never before. But this is a good thing, right? Well, I think so. I think this crisis we have faced is an opportunity for us all to think about HOW we do this thing called work and how we control its expansiveness into our lives. We all have responsibilities and priorities that lie outside our work. These are the things that drive our purpose and if they are not the things driving us then we need to take a step back and re-asses, what the hell we’re all doing here.

2. Respect each other

This is not a hard one, but old school leadership styles demand a stoic, fear driving figure head who threatens your job all to instil some motivation. Well, I have been in organisations driven by such figure heads and you won’t be surprised when I say it flat out doesn’t work. Fear disables creativity quicker than Superman being disarmed by Kryptonite.

The blame does not all lie with leaders. Perhaps you have someone in your team who lacks a little humbleness and exerts unsubstantiated hubris. You know the type they talk down anyone else ideas because THEY have all the answers and THEY know all there is to know. You leave meetings with them feeling like a hollow tip to the back of the throat might be more enjoyable.

What’s the cure? Well its simple. Turn up when you are supposed to turn up. Let people talk and listen to ideas before shooting them out of the sky. Actually, listen. Don’t just be worried about appearing to be listening when instead you are checking your phone or thinking about if bangs would make you look better on Zoom.

Actively listen, interpret and analyse what others are stating. Respect each other and know that NO-ONE has all the answers. That is right, no-one. There may be one person in the room who makes the final call but developing possible solutions should be done together.

3. Collaborate

We all think that innovative genius comes from some guy (yes I’m using a worn out stereotype) sitting in a room all by himself with his new advancement in technology and goes on to change the world and become a multi billionaire at 24. This is not reality.

Success comes to these individuals after many failures and mockery. Look deep into any stories of creative genius or ingenuity and you’ll find a journey filled with bouncing ideas around with other experts. Building on ideas and/or straight out stealing ideas and tweaking them.

Mark Twain famously once said “There is no such thing as a new idea. It is impossible. We simply take a lot of old ideas and put them into a sort of mental kaleidoscope. We give them a turn and they make new and curious combinations.”

Mark Twain

If you’re thinking of your colleagues as simply getting in the way to you doing your job there’s your first clue you need to rethink your mindset on collaboration.

If there is anything that this current crisis has taught us is that we need each other. We need each other in our day to day lives but we also need others to help form our own individual ideas.

Collaboration is not a team building exercise. Collaboration and creative thought need to happen every day. That is why meetings are the perfect playground for you to slide right into creating a creative team.
Collaboration provides people with satisfaction and engagement, and it helps organisations turn around and deliver on new ideas, faster.

4. Follow a Framework

You know where I am going with this. I’m a design thinking consultant so of course I’m going to say this is the framework to success. Let us simplify it though. It’s simply a staged process like walking (one foot in front of the other) that will help your team begin their journey to innovation. It will help them come up with new ideas and deal with ambiguity.

If you are not dabbling in design thinking this can seem all too impossible and irrelevant. You might be saying “we’re no Apple or IBM” or “it’s not applicable to us”. I’d wholehearted disagree on both counts but for the cynics out there I encourage any organisation to find its own framework. In reference to the quote from Mark Twain earlier look at design thinking, or Agile or Lean principles and steal small elements from each one.

Start small and experiment with what suits your organisations biggest challenge. If its reducing waste look at Lean, if it’s defining the difference between what customers say they want and what they really want then start with design thinking, or if its improving efficiencies and getting more done with less then explore Agile.

Follow a framework or steal someone else’s. The steps do not matter. Allow your team to do the work they love by giving them the freedom to play with the way things are done. The main point here is start small but just get started.

Are you being too critical in your meetings? Yes, it’s a time of high stress but when you criticise others ideas too early it has a detrimental effect to the free flow of ideas.

I’ve seen it time and time again. There is absolutely the need to analyse ideas and to consider the risks but if you do it too soon you are restricting the creative process. In fact you are flat out shooting it in the jugular.

A simple way to stay positive is to define your problem ahead of time into a ‘positive action statement’.

It’s a stressful time sure but now more than ever we need to keep stretching our creative legs and seek the opportunities.

Video 3min watch

How? was the question I was asked last week after posting a video on ‘bringing your culture online’.

Here’s a quick exercise anyone can implement to refocus on your culture as well as encouraging your team turn up to your online meeting with a mindset of active contribution rather than passive attendance. Heighten your teams engagement and leverage their creativity.

The numbers and research don’t lie, most of our meetings suck. According to research by Gallup senior executives spend two days or more a week in meetings despite the fact that 67% of meetings are considered to be “failures”. I’d dare say that time would have significantly spiked in the last couple of weeks for most execs.

Anything that requires us to turn up and zone out is not just a waste of time but a waste of our creative potential, a waste of an opportunity to truly connect and collaborate.

You can’t write an article on improving meetings without quoting some scary stats. Steven Rolberg’s research states that…

62% of participants said meetings miss opportunities to bring the team closer together.

71% said meetings are unproductive and inefficient.

64% said meetings come at the expense of deep thinking.

Poor meeting structures lead to low engagement and poor culture. If you want a more productive team who creates big ideas and gets stuck into creative problem solving, then you need to dedicate time to connection and heightening collaboration. The way to do that is to ensure you allocate time in your meeting to focus on culture, create an interactive experience and tie the jobs to be done back to the overall higher purpose and vision for the team.

Allocate time

In my experience this works best in the opening of the meeting. Dedicate 15 minutes at the beginning of your next team meeting and use this time to seek input from everyone who attends. This will help you stop your team feeling like passive participants and make them feel more like active contributors and idea makers.

Interactive experience

In a time like this where things are so uncertain, and people are experiencing high levels of change and stress

Some think of focusing on culture and engagement as nice things to do or the icing on the cake. We need to make the cake first sell it then we’ll think about ourselves later. Wrong. Instead, think of engagement and your culture as the cake tin. It’s what enables you to make the cake in the first place. Want a better cake? Then fix the holes in your tin.

So here’s 3 activities to get you started…

Method 1.

BRING YOUR VALUES TO LIFE.

Grab your list of values. Select one each week or each meeting and ask the team to each come prepared with one or two ideas as to how that value can be represented in your next online meeting.

Collate the ideas, discuss and pick some nice easy ways that you all agree as a team you want to uphold over the next few weeks.

Use the next meeting to summarise what was agreed to and at the end of the meetings to a value check in. Take 2 mins to write down how you think it went. Keep experimenting and tweaking as you go.

Benefits: This activity requires everyone to do some pre-work before the meeting so they are already in the mindset that they will be required to contribute.

It helps your team focus on agreed to goals and decision making. There’s not one individual who makes the call but a group who are working together. Essentially you are working out your collaboration and team cohesion muscles.

Method 2.

GET VISUAL.

Get participants to get and A4 piece of paper and a sharpie. Ask them to draw a picture 5 mins before they’re due to dial in that represents how they have been feeling that morning or day. You can have fun with this but just make sure the image is visible to everyone online. (Hence the sharpie instead of a pen). If the kids are at home grab a crayon if you have to. Then ask everyone to show their picture. If there is anyone who wants to share why they drew that picture. You’ll find some people are feeling great and some who might be feeling a little challenged that day could perhaps do with a phone call from someone who has some energy to give that day to support them. We’re all going through a lot so morning you might be on top of the world and afternoon you might need a pick me up.

Benefits: How many emails do you send each day? How many drawings do you do each day? By drawing an image, you are instantly activating new pathways in your brain. By opening new pathways, it allows you to interpret information differently and allow more critical thinking and creative problem solving.

Method 3.

GIVE A SHOUT OUT.

Tell a story that represents someone demonstrating the values either within your organisations or serving a client.

Give recognition to someone who has helped deliver on a project or task. Then go a step further and ask them to explain how they managed to get all the work done or how they prioritised this job with everything else they had going on.

The more you can get other to recognise positive behaviours and not just outcomes the more you help them to realise that they too can deliver on their seemingly endless tasks and major projects.

Benefits: This builds trust within your team and it helps people feel valued for the work they do. Trusting one another is one of the most valuable commodities we possess, and it is vital to cohesive teamwork. By going the one step further and asking the recognised team member to explain ‘how’ they achieved what they did or how they prioritised means that others in the team can then see how they themselves can follow positive behaviours and processes for the same outcomes. This step also fosters transparency and avoids the ‘hold your cards close to your chest’ behaviour which fractures teams. Success breeds success.

Don’t forget that your workplace culture is your own. Develop your own rituals. You can adopt some of the above or go out on your own and create something unique to your organisation that can create a sense of comradery and belonging.

Experiment and improve. Question the outcome, structure, behaviours and necessity of every meeting. Was it necessary to all jump online? Did everyone need to be there. Could the same be achieved by simply heading onto a teams chat or slack. If it’s an important announcement does everyone need to login at that point in time or could you simply send a video Prime Minister style give everyone a chance to digest then come into an online meeting to discuss peoples thoughts and questions.

If you’d like more tips on how to bring your culture online get in touch. No pressure, no pitch.

Stay creative! Cheers, Liv

This morning may have been the first morning most of the community logged into workplace meeting from home. How did it go?

Some are relishing the change. Others having their laptop set up in the bedroom and across the hall from the bathroom with 2+ kids at home is proving to be challenging or more like the multitasking challenge from hell.

Before you reach for that bottle of SSB before 10am lets press reset.

The problem with most online meetings is that it can be a distracting set up. Then its mostly a my turn, her turn, his turn to talk set up. Here’s a few tips to think about before you connect tomorrow.


Start with a culture moment


Take 10-15 mins to share some positive moments of what you’ve noticed happening with your teammates, colleagues and leaders around you.

Congratulate people who are demonstrating the values and behaviours you want your organisation to embrace now more than ever and into the future.

If your facilitating ask a leader or manager to start and then get everyone involved.

Being present


There’s nothing worse than a leader logging in when they feel like or taking calls while the meeting is going on. Yes, it’s time for urgency but support your team by dedicating solid time to them. I’m not talking about a one-off life or death moment I’m talking about a solid pattern of repetitive behaviour.

Look to structures meetings so they’re kept short and work them around the other priorities for the day. If it can’t be done say your piece and bounce. You’ll feel better about addressing the major priority you have, and you won’t diminish the time the rest of the team need to connect.

Give your team the freedom to collaborate and get back to you.

Driving engagement


There’s nothing more detrimental to any meeting than a ‘lets go around the table and share what we’re working on today, this week, for eternity’ structure.

It sure can feel like an eternity. While people speak other participants are checking out their hair or how killer their new virtual background looks.

Think about how you can mix it up.

Who’s going to do what, by when?


Last and you know it’s not least. Ensure as a team everyone keeps each other accountable. Reiterate the importance of the tasks outlined and the implications if things don’t progress.

There’s nothing more refreshing than leaders and teams who can be completely open and honest with each other. Think of it as a half time motivational huddle.

Then get out there smash those tasks and keep the progress updates as frequent as sales alerts at Christmas or the onset of a retail shut down during Covid-19. Ooops too soon?

With more and more offices clearing out by the day using online tools is not just proving a ‘nice to have’ or a plan b but the only way in which teams can continue to effectively hold meetings and communicate.  

It’s challenging times with many organisations grappling with the pace of change and putting in place new policies and procedures around the COVID-19. Those encouraging or enforcing team members work from home means they are now working with increasingly dispersed teams. We are looking at some quiet offices around town. (Que the tumbleweed).  

The need for dispersed teams to maintain high levels of communication is nothing new. This need has been around long before COVID-19 and let’s face it anyone here in WA has at some time worked for an organisation that is dispersed across our 10,194 km coastline but the need to connect online has never been higher than right now.  

IBM conducted a survey which stated about 60% of CEOs cited creativity as the most important leadership quality yet when we look at our meeting structures there often dedicated to sifting through tasks and tick lists. How much time are you dedicating to improving your team’s creativity to solve problems? Are you using tools to help them be more visual and collaborative. Creativity is a business asset. 

We’ve got to get stuff done, why invest time in creative thought?   

By promoting creativity, you heighten the engagement of your team. More engaged team members deliver better productivity and better outcomes for your customers, resulting in increases in revenue. All of this is supported in Gallup’s article on Fostering Creativity at Work.  

Keep your team connected and collaborating with these online tools. Make your meetings more visual and engaging.

  1. IdeaFlip https://ideaflip.com/ 

If you’re just getting started with an online tool Idea Flip has an incredibly simple user interface that allows you to display brainstorming ideas and move them around quickly and easily. You can upload PDF’s and images and if your working on developing a website or making changes to your site you can take screen shots to communicate what you want with your creative team. You can export all your work from the session and there’s an option for feedback. It’s a simple web app but does come with a small subscription cost. 

  1. Miro https://miro.com/ 

Has a range of templates to help you with everything from strategic planning to collaborative brainstorming. There’s a huge range of templates in here that you can pick and choose from and you can see your colleagues commenting and adding their notes live. The work is then exportable.  

Some of the templates like the customer journey mapping templates are a little simplistic so you’ll need to explore the templates and see if it meets the requirements of what you’re working on.  

  1. Creatlr https://www.creatlr.com/ 

Again, there’s a bunch of templates to search through from empathy mapping, customer journey templates to business model templates and even change management templates. However, for free users you’ll find some templates are locked which requires a subscription.

  1. StormBoard https://stormboard.com/ 

Stormboard is free for up to 5 users (with free trials for more users) and available across all devices. There is a range of templates to select from depending on your needs. If you’re an Agile team you’ve got your daily stand up available and a Kanban board. You can also any export of the templates to PDF, PowerPoint or word so you can take a snapshot in time then continue working on your project.  

Tips for getting started 

  1. Select someone from your team with a knack for facilitation and bringing people together. They can get familiar with your new online tool and oversee getting the team set up. Once set up they can then run the meeting and guide everyone through it.  
  1. Set up a test run first to ensure when the CEO comes online that you’ve got any nuances worked out. 
  1. After the meeting reflect and ask for feedback on what went well and what needs to be improved for next time. These online tools are simply tools that you should look to customise and work in with your organisations systems and process.  
  1. Once you’re familiar with one tool or template see where you can trial others.  

Stay calm and stay connected!  

Cheers, Liv 

Now is the perfect time to start speaking to your customers and refine what and how you are offering your products or services. With people’s routines in upheaval and new needs evolving everyday its more important than ever to find out what your customers are thinking, feeling and doing.

The needs of society are being transformed right before our eyes. The elderly and disabled are being given their own shopping hours, baking has seemed to make an all-time come back with flour being raided from shelves and of course the major need that kicked everything off and signalled the beginning of the apocalypse, the need for toilet paper.

If your chasing sustainability and growth for your business in this rapidly changing environment, then focusing on the needs of your customers is the most certain way to get there.

Add 60% on to your bottom line. Is that a better figure to what you’re pulling in now? Or perhaps the future is so uncertain you’re not sure what the rest of the financial year has is store. Research by Deloitte and Touche, states customer centric companies are 60% more profitable compared to companies without such a focus.

With a customer focus you’ll be in good company. This little gem is from Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder.

The most important single thing is to focus obsessively on the customer. Our goal is to be earth’s most customer-centric company.”

It’s hard to argue that there isn’t value in being customer focused. Especially when you are quoting a guy that makes variably $11.5 million per hour. That’s right per hour, it’s not a typo.

Business Insider Australia states “Amazon has 14 leadership principles that guide its employees’ business decisions, but founder Jeff Bezos said just one is the “secret sauce” to the trillion-dollar company’s success. Focusing on what customers want or need has driven many of Amazon’s most profitable business moves.

“The No. 1 thing that has made us successful by far is obsessive compulsive focus on the customer as opposed to obsession over the competitor,”

Bezos said in a talk at the Economic Club of Washington on September 13.

Using your data to analyse customer needs?

The problem with using data to analyse customer demand is the lag. By the time you’ve got the data to make a decision the needs may have changed . That’s how quickly things are moving. It’s also tricky to predict where customer behaviour will go.

If you have an in depth understanding to what is in the heart and minds of your customers, then you will beat any algorithm.

How to get started.

It’s simple. For an organisation to become customer centric we need to connect to the customer. The simplest way to do this is by talking to them.

I embark on customer empathy interviews regularly and I have a 100% hit rate on uncovering invaluable insights about customers and their needs. It helps organisations validate their ideas or their gut feel for the right solution and it erodes the uncertainty in making tough business decisions.

Once you have the key insights it’s about refining how you can better improve your service, your customers experience or you may uncover a huge slap in the face opportunity that helps you design a whole new service. Put simply, it helps you meet the needs of customers. The “secret sauce” as Bezos terms it, to success.

Ex-President Barack Obama making calls himself to voters from a local campaign field office in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Get customer centric in 4 days

Here’s how I can help.

Day 1-2 – I Start interviewing your customers

Day 3 – Write up a complete customer insights report to help you understand your customers and their motivations

Day 4 – We hold an on online workshop with your team to get creative and find new solutions and new ways of doing things

It’s time to get human. Organisations need to understand their customers and jump in their shoes. If you’d like to chat more about how to design solutions for your customers send me a message. I’m here to help.

I’m about to embark on another series of empathy interviews and I’ve found myself in the same place I do every time before I pick up that phone and reach out to my client’s customers. Nervous!

I’m nervous about the reception I get on the other end of the phone. I hate to think of the fact that I’m imposing on people’s day, perhaps I’m interrupting them. Sometimes people aren’t receptive to being asked their opinions. We are so used to getting surveys from organisations that when we receive a phone call from a human asking us questions we are surprised.  “Wow, you actually are asking me real questions?” is what one of my interviewees said.

Here’s where I’m going to be honest 98% of my interviews are amazing and I’ve never gone without gaining incredible results. NEVER. It’s why I do what I do. I love bringing new insights to organisations and helping them learn more about their customers. BUT I have stumbled on 1 or 2 individuals who were let’s say not so receptive. Wait, I said I was going to be honest…. OK they were pretty nasty and of course these very short conversations are the ones that always stick out in my mind. Not the other 100’s of conversations that I’ve had. You know all those ones that were hugely valuable and insightful for my clients and entirely fascinating for me.

This is why I understand why organisations find it hard to reach out to their customers.

Despite the fact that asking your team to talk to your customers could be the cheapest and most valuable thing your organisation can do, it’s not being done.

It’s not my job….

It becomes even trickier when you get into debates of who’s job is it to talk to the customers. If you have a customer’s service team it’s them. If you have a service delivery team it’s could also be their job or a sales team… yep they’re right, there it’s up to them.

Here’s the problem with that. In a situation where you are delivering the service people find it hard to be upfront. They want the service to remain up to scratch so they’re not going to bite the hand delivering the service. Then there’s re-pour. Anyone in sales are good at creating re-pour it’s how to make a sale step.1 in sales 101. The customer wants a good deal, so I’ll keep my mate onside.

Whilst we all find it hard to ask for feedback it tends to go up a notch when its from a customer. No body wants to be reported as doing a bad job so let’s navigate this idea quicker than an F1 car at a round roundabout.  

3 tips for getting customer insights FAST!

1. Put yourself in their shoes

Empathy is the starting point to success. Think abut what your customers are faced with and how your product or service is either helping them or potentially hindering them.

2. Have a plan

I said a plan. Not a script. Think about the key challenges your business is facing and how that relates to your customer.

Don’t get skewed feedback. Look at the relationship between the person asking the questions and the person answering. Here’s where a third party from outside your organisation is ideal.

3. Make it a focus

Think about the importance of the information you’re after. Remember the most innovative companies in the world all have one thing in common. Being connected to their customers and gaining insights on their needs.

Want to fast track the process of getting customers insights? Shortcut all the accountability issues, crush the lead time it takes to get insights and ensure you get open honest (not skewed) feedback that you can take right into your strategic planning. Here’s where I can help. Contact me for more details.

Let’s chat about how I can help your organisation become more connected to your customers.

Put the customer’s needs first and you’ll thrive.

“Know what your customers want most and what your company does best. Focus on where those two meet.”

Kevin Stirtz

So you’re about to endeavour on your marketing plan. Where do you start?

Have you googled your marketing plan template full of headings like market opportunity, competitors, SWOT analysis, promotional plan, and social media schedule. You could be working for months and still be working on the plan. It never seems polished enough which holds back your execution.

Here’s a novel idea. Throw it out and just spend some time thinking. Take your shoes off and mentally put those toasty tootsies into the shoes of your customers.

Now you might be in an organisation with a plethora of data. Great! Get your digital team to give you some insights as to what the individuals who are visiting your website look like. They may have heaps or limited data but go with what you’ve got but don’t stop there. Use this as a guide but do some more reflection.
Look at your current customers. Who are they, where are they, what do they do but most importantly how do you help them. You might have a few different types of customers. People from different sectors, people who fill different roles and that’s ok. Who is typically your main type of customer and what the subsets of your other customers.
You might come up with 3-4 typical types of people. Now let’s give them a name, age and start thinking about the action they take before they find you. Think about their worries, their pain points and their aspirations.
Now have a chat with these customers. What language do they use? How do they talk about your product or service? Now you’re onto something.
Use this intel, this data, this skunkworks mission insights and think about how you can reach your customers differently…. Key word is differently. Think about what you are already doing and do something new.
Don’t start planning your marketing until you know more about who…. (as in the individuals, the people, the Geoff’s, the Mary’s) you are talking to.
B2B and B2C is irrelevant. It’s H2H. Human to Human. The context of consumer or business may involve different tactics or methods but marketing at it’s core is about communicating to people whether in a business or consumer environment.
Start with you customer in mind and the rest gets a bit easier from there.